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things happening. let us do our thing. those areas of technology or entrepreneurs are allowed to go forth, whether to sell funds or cash machines, are going to work great are on the world. that is all the innovation and opportunity we need -- such as all the opportunity we need. provide in the outlook -- innovation for us. >> do policy makers like to come down here? >> they do like to come down. we think is very important that they see what the real world is like, so they can make votes and do other things that are affecting how we build products and what you can do and things like that. great innovators like apple and google and others, we hired them here in the united states, and we have great international companies here. but the u.s. is the world leader and we want to keep it that way. it is important that we have the right policies. >> we walked into the displays and saw that you had your legislative agenda essentially on that table, including about, so but, and others. -- hipaa, sopa and others. what has this been like for you? >> it has been great for us. we killed hipaa and sopa.
, we just want to let us innovate, let us do our thing. those areas of technology where entrepreneurs are allow today go forward are ones which would work great in countries around the world. that's all the opportunity you want. let innovation flourish. and to policymakers or lawmakers come down to this? do they enjoy seeing this? >> guest: they're very busy, and they do like coming down. it's tough getting them to las vegas. we think it's very important that policymakers see what the real world is like so they can make informed decisions when they're actually making votes and doing other things that are affecting, basically, how you can build products, what you can do, who you trade with, things like that. great american companies like apple and google and others are -- we have them here in the united states, and we have great international companies here. but it's working. the u.s. is the world leader. we want to keep it that way. but it's important we have the right policies. >> host: when we walked into the displays here, we saw your table, the cea table, and you had your legislat
to use spectrum much more efficiently. >> was that technology developed in san diego? >> yes. also here is the debt. what are you display here? woody showing to members of congress and the staff? >> this demonstrates how 3g and next-generation mobile technology can improve people's lives. one of our projects -- a health care project and an education project. the health-care project -- this is a wireless monitoring ship that allows patients with congestive heart failure to monitor their health and their house daily. they can use in mobile application and take their blood pressure, their blood oxygen level, their heart rate, their weight -- and they can collect the data using the mobile app and transmit it to their nurses and doctor, who are listening on a daily basis. the doctors said and able to see the data. if they see a decline in the patient costs health, they will contact the patient immediately so that it prevents them from having to be readmitted to the hospital. >> do you see savings in health- care dollars with this? >> definitely. patients -- there are about 1 million people a
the u.s. electrical grids. >> this week on "the communicators" walt mossberg who writes a personal technology column in the "wall street journal" that is geared toward the average technology user. >> host: tech watchers and viewers of this program will recognize the name walt mossberg of the "wall street journal," maybe not the face, but he is joining us this week on "the communicators". he writes the personal technology column in the "wall street journal," and he is also co executive editor of all things the .com. when did you start writing your column? >> guest: it was 1992 -- 1991. you can call me walt. >> host: i appreciate that. do you remember what your first column was about in 1991? >> guest: the first line of my first column was personal computers are just too hard to use and is now your fault. the idea behind the column was there are a lot of computer columns of the time, technology columns. the contribution i made was to convince the editors of the journal that we should write a column on like nearly all the others that was not written by geeks for geeks but was actually
understanding is that it is not illegal to be a monopoly. it is just a legal to use your monopoly power in a certain way. that is ancient history. there is an antitrust case involving apple and sun book publishers right now. there is a google anti traced -- antitrust case. these are -- it is not the sheer size of these companies. sometimes it tracks the attention of the government as the way they interact with the economy, the way they interact with privacy, the way they interact with commerce. in the case of that will, they are very big in a dollars since. they are big on the impact they have on everyone's lives. obviously, that is going to attract the attention of regulators and enforcement agencies in the city. i will say that i have lived in washington for nearly 40 years and i spent 20 years as a washington correspondent and editor in our washington bureau. before turning to technology, my observation is that the government in general was and still is behind in its actual integration and use of tied biology on a day-to-day basis. i will give you an example. the government is the la
>> we would like to hear from you. tweet us for feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> you've been watching booktv, 48 hours of book programming beginning saturday morning at 8 a.m. it into monday morning at 8 a.m. future. nonfiction books all weekend every weekend right here on c-span2. .. >> this week on "the communicators" i walt mossberg, who writes a personal technology column in "the wall street journal." >> host: well, regular tech watchers and viewers of this program will recognize the name walt mossberg of "the wall street journal," maybe not the face, but he is joining us this week on "the communicators." he writes the personal technology column in the "wall street journal", and he's also co-executive editor of all things d.com. mr. mossberg, when did you start writing your personal technology column? >> guest: well, peter, it was 1991, and you can call me walt. >> host: well, i appreciate that. do you remember what your first column was about in 1991? >> guest: the first line of my first column was personal computers are just too hard to use, and it's not your fault. and
committee chairman dianne feinstein on the state of u.s. and global intelligence counterterrorism efforts. [inaudible conversations] >> and you're watching "the communicators" on c-span. this week we're on capitol hill visiting the consumer electronics show here. a lot of manufacturers and tech companies are up here to show some of their wares to the policymakers on capitol hill. here's some of the interviews that we did this week. and the san diego-based company qualcomm is also displaying here on capitol hill. we're joined by alice tornquist. what are you displaying here? what are these? >> we're really focusing on all of the ways our company is including the mobile experience for consumers, so we're featuring our next s4 snapdragon chip set which is enabling all sorts of new capabilities. >> host: such as? >> guest: the s4 has tremendous capabilities in graphics, so you can get game console quality gaming possibilities with the chip set, and this is on a tablet, which we have to remind people. so getting that level of quality on a tablet is something new. and you also have with the s4
to allow patients with congestive heart failure monitor their health using a mobile application taking blood oxygen level, heart rate and weight to and transmit to doctors why is it -- wirelessly. if the owners sees a decline in the patient's health and will contact them immediately. >> host: is there savings of health care dollars? >> definitely. 1 million people are admitted annually with congestive heart failure and with than 30 days there readmitted. this allows better monitoring and to intervene when the health declines. >> host: is the technology in use now? >> guest: launched medical center in arizona for patients and remote areas and native american reservations to coordinate health care. >> host: there is one other technology here mr. gordon? what will you show us? >> i can take a picture so if you push the shutter button with the perfect smile. >> thank you very much. with the consumer electronics. >> you may have seen the new commercial and joining us is the vice president of dish network. >> this is the hopper relaunched it march 15 a d.r. to record more than other asian an
is coming froms their agenda by virtue of us knowing where the money's coming from. so this legislation will stop the special treatment for the super pacs by making sure that they play by the rules that everybody else has to. mr. president, there's going to be a lot of commentary here tonight. i thank you for the opportunity, and i yield the floor. mr. merkley: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new mexico. mr. udall: thank you, mr. president. let me, first of all, just thank senator whitehouse for heading up this campaign finance task force. i think this has been a real solid effort by a number of senators, and senator whitehouse, whether it's at netroots or here on the senate floor, has been participating this evening, and we really appreciate all of his help. the presiding officer, senator merkley, has also been a key member of the task force. senator bennet, who is going to be speaking after me, another member of the task force. and we so appreciate all of us getting together. and one of the things we need to be reminded of this evening is where we are. we just t
beckstrom joins us from las vegas. mr. beckstrom, thank you for being on "the communicators." also joining us here in our washington studio is gautham nagesh, editor of the technology executive briefing for cq. mr. nagesh, if you would start the questioning. >> host: absolutely. hello, rod. our first question today is who owns the internet right now? or the physical star of the inter-- star of the internet? >> guest: governments own a very small amount, but we estimate over 85% is actually owned by private individuals and firms. >> host: and a look at the federal infrastructure involved. >> host: and are they concentrated in any particular country, or is it fairly spread apart? >> guest: you know, we estimate there's approximately 2.2 billion users on the internet today. about half of that investment overall is in asia, and half is spread around the world. the united states has got a pretty good portion, europe, but you've also got good penetration growing in latin america and africa. >> host: so, rod beckstrom, who manages it? >> guest: well, you know, the internet is a magnificently dece
, is what it's called and rod beckstrom joins us from las vegas. mr. beckstrom, thank you for being on the communicators, also joining us in the washington studio is galfin mcgesh of washington quarterly, the editor of the technology, executive brief fog cq. if you would start the questioning. host: absolutely. hello rod. our first question today is who owns the internet right now. guest: well, the structure of the internet? it's mostly owned by the private sector, by individuals, companies, governments, on a very small amount. but we estimate that over 85 percent of the internet is actually owned by private individuals and firms. host: and a look a the physical infrastructure involved. are they concentrated in any particular country or is it fairly spread apart? guest: we estimate there's about 2.2 or 2.3 billion users on the internet today, just over half of those are in asia. so you can guess that about half of that investment overall is in asia, and half is spread around the world. the united states has got a pretty good portion, europe, but you've also got good penetration grow
icann it is what it's called and rod beckstrom joins us from las vegas. thank you for being on the communicators and joining us here in the washington studio of congressional quarterly if you could start the questioning. >> welcome our first question today is who owns the internet right now. estimates owned by the private sector by individual companies, government on a very small amount but we estimate over 85% of the internet is owned by private individuals and firms are the concentrated in a particular country or is that fairly spread apart? >> we estimate there's about 2.2 or 2.3 billion users and the internet today. just over half of those are in asia say you can guess that a lot half of that investment overall is in asia and half is around the world. the united states has a good portion coming year up, but you've also got good penetration growing in latin america and africa. >> so, rod beckstrom, who manages it? >> it is a decentralized creation and is governed by a multi stakeholder community with martin to wondered 40 different countries and territories involved, and
everything we can if you buy from a company. the consumer doesn't know or find it out and took hrt use it and get that states are not the consumer doesn't know or find it out until they try to use it and get that states are not the consumer doesn't know or find it out until they try to use it and get that states are not the consumer doesn't know or find it out until they try to use it and get that states are not effect makes viburnum shoes. the shoes of the chosen them on our committee testifying about the fact that they have an identical website for more than one that looks just like a website. you don't know. you order what you think is the original product and get it cheap knockoff shipped from china and that kind of problem needs to be addressed. so there is generally consensus among people on all sides of the issue that there's a problem that needs to be addressed. obviously there's not concerned about how to go about doing that. from there back have henry hyde is chairman of the judiciary committee and we had the digital millennium copyright act. the big issue between a tech comp
of service they'd le to offer and what rmn ecry dienin o ut atelof hers having access to and using information about their, their behaor, thwoa foven agencies to regulate strongly in this area -- which is the direction they've attempt today go in europe and i don't think with greatsy -ulve en htoete d abypeo wh i pogr t ouof information and put that information at the will of consumers to say, yes, i want to dohis, no,onan d at ortot, cni wh ybeor newinet 'sthentt h a more sophisticated way of doing it. if you went into a men's clothing store, per, and the salesmanemembered that you supaulyp oitran d htehdo rbeinadan on lrle d h you've got a sale on the suits you like, you might say, oh, i don't want you to be bothering me about that, and he won't call yougain tthnd yht suouik ole t'tifntn avbl yn td internet. if amazon.com remembers you bought a biography, and next pops up ome beroheir site and aiph a b an, no ond . vecilalr o e s pec ghentive areas like medical records and financl information and children more broadly,nd weenled eceseaw inatabt's mmalivsnder activities, i think
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14

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